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This list relates to the year 2016-2017 Academic Year which ended on 31/08/2017
  1. Introduction and key texts 12 items
    1. Welcome to the electronic reading list for GEG4106 Reinventing Britain!

       

      For this module I expect you to read widely. Information on general texts is provided in this section of the reading list; more detailed and specialist literature can be found in the weekly sections. As far as possible I have included up-to-date literature that is available on the topics in question and, where appropriate, will ensure that copies of high demand items are available in the teaching collection of the library. The amount of literature that I will suggest for each session may seem intimidating, but you are not expected to read all of it! Because of pressure on materials I have prepared lists of references which will often cover similar ground, so that even if your first-choice book is not available, you should still be able to find material from other sources. Note that the starred material is particularly useful.

       

      In reading around the material covered in lectures, you should be selective and critical: selective, because you simply do not have the time to read everything on this list; and critical, because you may find that there are differences of opinion between myself and the writer of an article, or that you yourself disagree with either the lecturer or an author. Try to keep constantly in your mind the relationship between what you are reading and the content of the lectures and the aims of the module. This will help you select and focus on the parts of a book or article that are most relevant to you. Also, because of the rapidly-changing nature of the module subject matter it is essential that you keep up to date by reading a quality newspaper such as The Guardian, The Financial Times, The Independent or The Telegraph. Credit will be given for evidence of such independent reading in essays.

       

      If you have any suggestions of material that should be added to the reading list, or purchased by the library, please let me know!

       

      Tim Brown

      tim.brown@qmul.ac.uk

    2. Key texts 11 items
      1. The economic geography of the UK - Coe, Neil M., Jones, Andrew M. 2010

        Book Suggested for student purchase Although not essential, I strongly recommend purchasing this volume. It covers most of the issues we are interested in and is the most up to date volume available.

      2. One of the most profilic geographers writing on the UK is Danny Dorling, Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography, School of GEography adn the Environment, University of Oxford. Several recent books deal with themes covered in this module. You can find out more about Danny's work by visiting his web site: http://www.dannydorling.org/

      3. So you think you know about Britain? - Dorling, Danny 2011

        Book  Aimed at a popular audience, this is an interesting volume that will get you thinking about issues covered in the module.

      4. Injustice: why social inequality persists - Dorling, Daniel 2010

        Book 

      5. Human geography of the UK - Dorling, Daniel 2005

        Book 

      6. Identity in Britain: a cradle-to-grave atlas - Thomas, Bethan, Dorling, Daniel 2007

        Book 

      7. Several other texts deal with recent changes to the UK economy and economic geography:

      8. Human geography of the UK: an introduction - Hardill, Irene, Graham, David T., Kofman, Eleonore 2001

        Book  See also electronic copy below.

      9. Human geography of the UK - Daniel Dorling, Graham Allsopp 2005 (electronic resource)

        Book 

      10. The future of success - Reich, Robert B. 2002, c2000

        Book 

      11. The State we're in - Hutton, Will 1995

        Book 

  2. Week One: Introduction: Reinventing Britain 11 items
    Today’s session will introduce the key themes of the module. It will describe the content of the module, outline the assessment methods and explain how learning will take place. We introduce some of the issues and questions that the module will focus on by discussion of a recent report entitled Cities Unlimited: Making Regeneration Work published in August 2008 by the right wing think tank Policy Exchange. The report offered a radical and controversial proposal for ‘transforming Britain’. Over the course of the module we will gather material and perspectives that will challenge the ideas underpinning this report. The remainder of the session provides some broader context to the processes of change and reinvention that will be the focus of the rest of the module. Concentrating on the last 30-40 years, it considers key economic shifts, the changing role of the state and some of the broad social transformations that have reshaped Britain. It also stresses the geographical dimensions to change: the shifting global context to British fortunes and the geographically uneven experiences of change and reinvention within the country.
    1. Cities Unilimited: Policy Exchange Report 1 item
      Here is the full reference to the controversial Policy Exchange report discussed in the lecture.
    2. Other reading 6 items
      For a broad introduction to the processes of change and reinvention that will be the core focus of this module, have a look at one of the introductory texts:
      1. The economic geography of the UK - Coe, Neil M., Jones, Andrew M. 2010

        Book Recommended Read Chapters 2 and/or 3

      2. A United Kingdom?: economic, social and political geographies - Mohan, John 1999

        Book Optional Several chapters are relevant here, but start with the introduction and, perhaps chapters 3 and 4. Note, that more than any of the other core texts, Mohan takes an explicitly ‘political-economy’ perspective.

      3. Human geography of the UK - Dorling, Daniel 2005

        Book Optional See also the companion website http://www.sasi.group.shef.ac.uk/hguk/index.htm This volume is focused more on geographical inequality than change although some of the chapters explore changing inequalities over time. No single chapter can be recommended – dip into those that interest you and look relevant to other sessions in the module.

      4. The changing geography of the United Kingdom - Gardiner, V., Matthews, M. H., Johnston, R. J., Institute of British Geographers 2000

        Book Optional Ron Johnston’s opening chapter is a useful starting point here.

      5. The changing geography of the United Kingdom - Gardiner, V., Matthews, M. H. 1999 (electronic resource)

        Book Optional E-copy of previous.

      6. Human geography of the UK: an introduction - Hardill, Irene, Graham, David T., Kofman, Eleonore 2001

        Book Optional Much of section one (pp. 1–50) is relevant.

    3. Thatcher's Britain 4 items
      Some of the older texts also contain relevant material and are especially good at analysing the impact of Thatcher’s policies on Britain.
      1. Policy and change in Thatcher's Britain - Cloke, Paul J. 1992

        Book Optional

      2. Divided Britain - Hudson, Ray, Williams, Allan M 1995

        Book Optional

      3. The North-south divide: regional change in Britain in the 1980s - Lewis, J. R., Townsend, Alan R. 1989

        Book Optional

      4. Uneven regional change in Britain - Townsend, Alan R. 1993

        Book Optional

  3. Week Two: A post-industrial nation? The political economy of de-industrialisation in Britain 13 items
    This session focuses on de-industrialisation in Britain. In outline terms, it seeks to trace Britain’s shift from being ‘the first industrial nation’ to becoming a ‘post-industrial’ economy. Drawing upon some of the literature on these themes, it examines explanations put forward to account for ‘de-industrialisation’ (a process of relative and absolute decline in manufacturing industry’s contribution to the economy). We emphasise the role and importance of governments and corporations in promoting and responding to certain political and ideological agendas as a reason for the accelerated period of de-industrialisation that has been a feature of the last 30 years. A further key issue in understanding changes to Britain’s economy relates to its changing global position and the emergence of new international divisions of labour. The lecture also offers some brief consideration of the uneven geographical impacts of de-industrialisation within the UK. It finishes with the example of the North East where there has been a dramatic reduction in manufacturing activity over the last 30 years. For some commentators (e.g. Hudson, 1989) this region was ‘wrecked’ by the policies of Conservative and later New Labour governments who promoted the economic interests of the South East over and above those of the manufacturing regions like the North East.
    1. De-industrialisation 5 items
      1. The economic geography of the UK - Coe, Neil M., Jones, Andrew M. 2010

        Book Recommended Read Chapter 10 by Ray Hudson, pp. 139-152

      2. The Geography of de-industrialisation - Martin, Ron, Bowthorn, Bob 1986

        Book Recommended See especially Chapter 1.

      3. Wrecking a region: state policies, party politics and regional change in north east England - Hudson, Ray 1989

        Book Optional A challenging book, but a classic account of the politically managed decline of the North East's manufacturing economy. Will offer longer term context to our visit to the North East later in the semester.

      4. Producing places - Hudson, Raymond c2001

        Book Optional More advanced reading -- will offer further insights into the political economy perspective offered by Ray Hudson.

    2. The knowledge economy 8 items
      1. Defnining the Knowledge Economy - Ian Brinkley 2006

        Website Recommended Published by The Work Foundation, this is a useful introduction to the idea of the knowledge economy.

      2. Knowledge economies: clusters, learning and co-operative advantage - Cooke, P. N. 2001

        Book Optional Useful essays on what the knowledge economy is and how it works.

      3. Regional economies as knowledge laboratories - Cooke, P., Piccaluga, Andrea 2004

        Book Optional Read the chapter by Martin Sokol, pp. 216-231.

      4. Toward the learning region - R Florida 06/1995

        Article Optional Classic article by American sociologist Richard Florida

      5. The future of success - Reich, Robert B. 2002, c2000

        Book Optional Classic -- scholarly but accessible treatise on the knowledge economy

      6. The journal Urban Studies published a special edition on the knowledge economy in 2002 (volume 39, parts 5 and 6). The following two papers are from that special edition -- you might also like to read some of the others; go to

        http://ezproxy.library.qmul.ac.uk/login?url=http://usj.sagepub.com/content/39/5-6.toc

      7. Trouble in E-topia: Knowledge as Intellectual Property - Christopher May 2002-5-1

        Article Optional Useful critical views.

  4. Week Three: Money, money, Money! Geographies of financial and business services 27 items
    We begin this session with a brief discussion of the ‘knowledge economy’. Drawing upon your research and reading, we will define it, think of the possible benefits of having an economy based on knowledge, and consider some of the critiques and limitations of the idea. Keeping this discussion in mind, the remainder of the session will focus on the growth of Britain’s service sector, examining in particular the importance of financial and business services to the British economy. The lecture will consider the uneven geography of service sector development and emphasise the varied nature of work within a broadly defined sector. Two examples of service sector employment will be examined in more detail – finance (associated with London and the South East) and call centres (a form ofemployment now found in many regions, but often associated with peripheral and former industrial areas).
    1. Services and the Knowledge Economy 8 items
      1. The economic geography of the UK - Coe, Neil M., Jones, Andrew M. 2010

        Book Recommended Read Chapter 11 by James Faulconbridge (pp. 153-165) and Chapter 4 by John Allen (pp. 49-60) Chapter 5 by Shaun French, Karen Lai and Andrew Leyshon (pp. 61-72)

      2. Services and space: key aspects of urban and regional development - Marshall, J. N., Wood, Peter A. 1995

        Book Optional

      3. The polycentric metropolis: learning from mega-city regions in Europe - Hall, Peter Geoffrey, Pain, Kathy 2006

        Book Optional

      4. Service worlds: people, organisations and technologies - Bryson, J. R., Daniels, P. W., Warf, Barney 2004

        Book Optional

      5. Knowledge, space, economy - Bryson, John R. 2000

        Book Optional

    2. Geographies of finance and financial services 12 items
      1. The economic geography of the UK - Coe, Neil M., Jones, Andrew M. 2010

        Book Recommended Read Chapter 4 by John Allen (pp. 49-60) Chapter 5 by Shaun French, Karen Lai and Andrew Leyshon (pp. 61-72)

      2. A United Kingdom?: economic, social and political geographies - Mohan, John 1999

        Book Optional See Chapter 7: Geographies of Money and Finance

      3. Several Key texts deal with the geography of financial services. Leading scholars in this area include Andrew Leyshon, Nigel Thrift adn Ron Martin. Dip in an out of these titles as inidicated. You might also like to browse key journals such as the Journal of Economic Geography

      4. Money, power and space - Corbridge, Stuart, Martin, Ron, Thrift, Nigel J 1994

        Book Optional

      5. Money and the space economy - Martin, Ron 1998

        Book Optional See especially Chapter 1 by Ron Martin (pp. 3-27), Chapter 3 by Jane Pollard (pp. 49-70), Chapter 5 by David Porteous (pp. 95-114), Chapter 6 by Leslie Budd (pp. 115-38)

      6. Money / space: geographies of monetary transformation - Leyshon, Andrew, Thrift, Nigel J 1997

        Book Optional

      7. Knowledge, space, economy - Bryson, John R. 2000

        Book Optional Lots here on the knowledge economy. On the finance theme see especially Chapter 9 by Jane Pollard and Andrew Leyson (pp. 142-56),

      8. An interesting take on financial geography from a banker:

      9. Financial geography: a banker's view - Laulajainen, Risto 2003

        Book Optional

      10. A couple of papers by Oxford Geographer Gordon Glark on London's financial service industries in a global context:

    3. Call Centres 7 items
      1. Taking Calls to Newcastle: The Regional Implications of the Growth in Call Centres - Ranald Richardson, Vicki Belt, Neill Marshall 06/2000

        Article Recommended

      2. Work-Life Imbalance in Call Centres and Software Development - Jeff Hyman, Chris Baldry, Dora Scholarios, Dirk Bunzel 06/2003

        Article Optional

  5. Week Four: Spend, spend, spend! Geographies of consumption and credit 19 items
    This session explores the growing importance of consumption – often underpinned by credit – for Britain’s economy and society. It covers a range of theme including consumption and ‘the affluent society’; the importance of housing consumption; the growing supply of credit for mortgages and personal lending; the problems of excess consumption and levels of indebtedness. We will note how many of these issues have distinctive geographies – for example, house prices have risen and fallen at different rates across the country; not all communities in Britain have access to credit and other financial services. The problem is ‘financial exclusion’ is one that we touch upon, but which could usefully be further researched via your reading.
    1. Consumption 4 items
      1. Human geography of the UK: an introduction - Hardill, Irene, Graham, David T., Kofman, Eleonore 2001

        Book Optional Look at Chapter 9

      2. The economic geography reader: producing and consuming global capitalism - Bryson, J. R. 1999

        Book Optional See the chapters by Bocock, pp. 279-90 and Wrigley and Lowe, pp. 311-14

      3. The changing geography of the United Kingdom - Gardiner, V., Matthews, M. H. 1999 (electronic resource)

        Book Optional See the chapter by David Crouch, pp. 261-75

      4. The changing geography of the United Kingdom - Gardiner, V., Matthews, M. H., Johnston, R. J., Institute of British Geographers 2000

        Book Optional See the chapter by David Crouch, pp. 261-75

    2. Housing 5 items
      1. The economic geography of the UK - Coe, Neil M., Jones, Andrew M. 2010

        Book Recommended Read the Chapter by Chris Hamnett, pp. 110-122

    3. Credit and financial exclusion 7 items
      1. Walking with moneylenders: The ecology of the UK home-collected credit industry - Andrew Leyshon, Paola Signoretta, David Knights, Catrina Alferoff 2006-1-1

        Article Optional

      2. Debt and Older People: How Age affects Attitudes to Borrowing - Stephen McKay, Elaine Kempson, Adele Atkinson, Mark Crame 2008

        Website Optional

      3. Over-indebtedness in Britain - Elaine Kempson 2002

        Website Recommended

    4. Geographical response to financial crisis 3 items
      1. Crises of Capitalism - RSA Animate - David Harvey

        Webpage Optional You'll enjoy this very clever animation with voice-over for leading Marxist and Geography David Harvey

  6. Week Five: Gender, Labour market change and the crisis of masculinity 18 items
    In this session we explore some of the relationships between gender and labour market change. Over the past 40 years women’s participation in the labour market has increased dramatically. At the same time, male employment rates have been in decline. Deindustrialisation has meant that many traditionally male jobs have been lost. For some commentators this job loss and the associated collapse of traditional household and community structures – the decline of the ‘male breadwinner’, for example – has led to a ‘crisis of masculinity’. This process of deindustrialisation has particularly affected men in their middle age. However, they are not the only males facing a crisis: concern has mounted in recent years over the underachievement of a generation of young (white) working-class men. In today’s session we introduce some of these arguments which frequently emphasise male (rather than female) disadvantage in the sphere of waged work. We also question the extent to which increased labour market participation has been good for women, noting the continuing inequalities in male and female employment and exploring the highly uneven distribution of unpaid labour between contemporary British men and women.
    1. Gender and labour market change 7 items
      1. Reading tips

        There is a wide range of material available for you to explore the relationships between gender and labour markets change in Britain. The work of Linda McDowell (Professor of Human Geography at the University of Oxford), has been especially significant. For introductions to gender and labour market change see:

      2. A Theory of Employment, Unemployment and Sickness - Christina Beatty, Stephen Fothergill, Rob Macmillan 10/2000

        Article Optional

      3. Service worlds: people, organisations and technologies - Bryson, J. R., Daniels, P. W., Warf, Barney 2004

        Book Optional See especially chapters 1, 4, 5 and 6.

      4. Life without Father and Ford: The New Gender Order of Post-Fordism - Linda McDowell

        Article Recommended Classic essay -- well worth reading.

      5. Father and Ford revisited: gender, class and employment change in the new millennium - Linda McDowell 12/2001

        Article Recommended An 'update' on the McDowell 1991.

    2. Crisis of masculinity 4 items
      1. More on the crisis of masculinity (Linda McDowell's work is especially significant):

    3. Other gender inequalities 7 items
      1. Gender inequalities and work - other issues and perspectives (beginning with the important work of Diane Perrons of the LSE):

      2. Geographies of the new economy: critical reflections - Daniels, P. W. 2007

        Book Optional See the chapter by Diane Perrons

      3. Children, changing families and welfare states - Lewis, Jane c2006 (electronic resource)

        Book Optional See the chapter by Diane Perrons

  7. Week Six: North and South: Still a nation divided? 11 items
    Over the last 40 years, scholars, politicians, journalists and others have debated the existence in Britain of a ‘North-South divide’. Following the economic crisis of the 1970s and the restructuring of the 1980s, many commentators identified growing patterns of regional inequality. The most visible of these was an apparent division between the north – a site of industrial decline, unemployment and growing poverty – and the south – the focus of service sector growth, job creation and prosperity. The ‘North-South’ divide continues to be an issue that attracts discussion and media attention. It has become a key way in which debates about regional inequality are framed and is an important referent point for in the construction of personal and regional identities. The purpose of this session is to evaluate current evidence for the existence of a ‘North-South divide’, to debate its causes and to consider what actions might be taken to reduce patterns of regional inequality.
    1. The economic geography of the UK - Coe, Neil M., Jones, Andrew M. 2010

      Book Recommended See Chapter 2 by Danny Dorling (pp. 12-28)

    2. Spatially unbalanced growth in the British economy - B. Gardiner, R. Martin, P. Sunley, P. Tyler 29/03/2013

      Article Recommended Very latest research on regional inequality -- this will become a classic paper!

    3. Human geography of the UK - Dorling, Daniel 2005

      Book Recommended Some good material in here on the geography of economic and social division.

    4. Unequal Britain: How real are regional inequalities - Overman Henry, Gibbons Steve

      Article Optional Recent article from two economic geographers at the LSE.

    5. The Future of Regional Policy - John Tomaney 2009

      Website Optional See Chapter 2 by Ron Martin (pp. 13-24).

    6. Cities Outlook 2012 - Centre for Cities 2012

      Website Optional See further data at http://www.citiesoutlook.org/

    7. The Economy in question - John Allen, Doreen Massey 1988

      Book Optional Classic text from the 1980s when there was much commentary on the divide.

    8. Divided Britain - Hudson, Ray, Williams, Allan M 1995

      Book Optional Though dated, offers good empirical evidence of divisions from 1980s and early 1990s.

    9. The North-south divide: regional change in Britain in the 1980s - Lewis, J. R., Townsend, Alan R. 1989

      Book Optional Key text from the 1980s when the north-south divide was of great concern.

    10. Geographies of England: the North-South divide, material and imagined - Baker, Alan R. H., Billinge, Mark 2004

      Book Optional Offers longer term historical perspectives

  8. Week Eight: Governing uneven regional development 23 items
    In this session we examine efforts made by British governments to manage uneven regional development. We trace the history of spatial policy in Britain – those political strategies aimed at tacking geographical inequalities and promoting economic growth. This starts with consideration of the Keynesian inspired managerialist approaches to regional development followed from the post War period up to the election of Margaret Thatcher. We then explore examples of the more ‘entrepreneurial’ types of policy that have dominated since the 1980s, including discussion of Urban Development Corporations, Enterprise Zones, Foreign Direct Investment, Sub-national government and devolution and Regional Development Agencies. We conclude by looking at current trends in regional policy which would appear to favour some of the approaches that were popular in the 1980s, notably the creation of Enterprise Zones.
    1. Politics, economy and spatial policy 17 items
      1. The economic geography of the UK - Coe, Neil M., Jones, Andrew M. 2010

        Book Recommended Read the chapter by Andy Pike and John Tomaney, pp. 91-109. It's a helpful overview and up-to-date.

      2. A new regional policy for Britain - Stephen Fothergill 07/2005

        Article Optional

      3. Beyond the Territorial Fix: Regional Assemblages, Politics and Power - John Allen, Allan Cochrane 12/2007

        Article Optional Challenging but useful!

      4. From managerialism to entrepreneurialism: the transformation in urban governance in late capitalism - David Harvey 1989

        Article Recommended Classic essay by Marxist Geographer David Harvey.

      5. Wrecking a region: state policies, party politics and regional change in north east England - Hudson, Ray 1989

        Book Optional Forcefully argued assessment of the impacts of Thatcherite policies on the North East of England -- the title give a clue to Ray Hudson's views!

      6. The future of the capitalist state - Jessop, Bob 2002

        Book Optional Another analysis from the left.

      7. Geographies of economies - Lee, Roger, Wills, Jane 1997

        Book Optional See the chapter by Ron Martin and Peter Sunley, pp. 278-89.

      8. The political economy of Britain's north-south divide - Ron Martin 1988

        Article Optional Classic essay reminding us of how uneven regional development has been shaped by political ideologies and policies

      9. A United Kingdom?: economic, social and political geographies - Mohan, John 1999

        Book Optional See chapter 12 for a good overview of spatial policy

      10. British urban policy: an evaluation of the urban development corporations - Imrie, Rob, Thomas, Huw 1999

        Book Optional Focused on the UDCs introduced by Thatcher and Heseltine in the 1980s. A critical evaluation and interesting given recent retrun to enterprise-led policies.

      11. Urban policy in Britain: the city, the state and the market - Atkinson, Rob, Moon, Graham 1994

        Book Optional Good overview of urban policy especially under Thatcher. Critical.

      12. Understanding urban policy: a critical approach - Cochrane, Allan 2007

        Book Optional Sophisticated -- challenging in places -- but very useful analysis of urban policy

      13. Urban renaissance?: New Labour, community and urban policy - Imrie, Rob, Raco, Mike 2003

        Book Optional Two geographers discuss urban policy under Blair

      14. Urban policy and politics in Britain - Hill, Dilys M. 2000

        Book Optional Written by political scientist rather tha a geographer and like several of above references does not deal with later New Labour Years or policy under current coalition government.

    2. Useful websites 6 items
      1. The LEP Network - The LEP Network

        Webpage Optional Official site for LEPs (Local Enterprise Partnerships) -- the coalition's approach to managing uneven spatial development

      2. Enterprise Zones | Looking for a place to grow your business?

        Website Optional Government site on new enterpise zones -- very similar in nature an purpose to enterpise zones of the 1980s.

      3. England's Regional Development Agencies

        Website Optional Now defunct. All agencies ceased operations on 31 March 2012.

      4. One North East

        Website Optional Also ceased operations on 31 March 2012.

      5. LDDC History Pages

        Website Optional London Docklands Development Corporation -- archive site.

  9. Week Nine: Understanding the uneven geography of the financial crisis 18 items
    This session explores the geographical experience of the financial crisis within Britain. Are we, as Chancellor George Osbourne might suggest, 'all in this together'? Or, have some regions and localities as well as certain groups of people living in Britain been hit harder than others? The main purpose of this session, which takes the form of a pre-prepared discussion and debate, is to think about some of the impacts of the crisis on Britain and its regions. You will work in groups to consider the evidence and debate the causes and consequences of the recession. You will also discuss what should be done, considering whether or not you agree with current political strategies for dealing with the crisis. Further instructions on how to prepare are contained within the handout below.
    1. Geographers and the financial crisis 9 items
      You will need to prepare for this session by undertaking some reading and research. Thus far, economic geographers have not published a great deal on the crisis. However, there are small number of articles that will offer insights into different dimensions of the crisis:
      1. Spatially unbalanced growth in the British economy - B. Gardiner, R. Martin, P. Sunley, P. Tyler 29/03/2013

        Article Recommended Very latest assessment of regional inequality looking at impacts of recessionary period

      2. The economic geography of the UK - Coe, Neil M., Jones, Andrew M. 2010

        Book Recommended See the chapter by Ron Martin, 29–46, for some longer term context.

      3. Placing the run on northern rock - J. N. Marshall, A. Pike, J. S. Pollard, J. Tomaney 20/01/2011

        Article Optional

    2. Other perspectives: popular and political 4 items
      1. Cities Outlook 2012 - Centre for Cities 2012

        Website Optional See further data at http://www.citiesoutlook.org/

      2. Britain's Broken Economy - and how to fix it - Larry Elliot 2010

        Website Optional Views on the crisis from a group of left wing scholars and pundits

      3. Recovery Britain: Research Evidence to Underpin a Productive, Fair and Sustainable Return to Growth - Romesh Vaitilingham 2011

        Website Optional A rather dull volume published by of the the UK's Economic and Social Research Council

    3. Useful websites 5 items
      The references above will provide you with a range of analytical, theoretical and political perspectives on the crisis. To understand its geographical impact you will need to do you own research looking for ‘grey literature’ (reports published by think tanks, pressure groups, academics, local and national government etc.) and analyses on various websites. Some useful think-tanks (of various political hues) where you will find commentary on the crisis, include:
      1. Centre for Cities

        Website Optional Politically fairly neutral -- though originally part of left of centre IPPR

      2. The Smith Institute

        Website Optional Left wing (note the institute is named after John Smith [the late Labour Leader] not Adam Smith!)

      3. The Centre for Social Justice

        Website Optional Right wing -- founded by MP Iain Duncan Smith

  10. Week Ten: Is the North resilient? 10 items
    Analyses of local and regional development have begun to focus on the notion of resilience. Inspiration for this shift in emphasis comes from research exploring how communities, localities and more broadly regions have responded, adapted and demonstrated resilience in the face of extraordinary events and shocks. Much of this research comes from the United States where studies have been conducted into events such as Hurricane Katrina and 9/11. Commentators have subsequently looked to transfer resilience thinking to a much wider range ofissues including those relating to more mundane aspects of economy and society. The core questions at the heart of much of this research are: what is meant by resilience? what does resilience look like? what makes some people and places more resilient than others? This session will explore these questions by focusing on examples of resilience identified in the North East.
    1. Resilience 3 items
      1. Resilience, adaptation and adaptability - A. Pike, S. Dawley, J. Tomaney 01/03/2010

        Article Recommended

    2. Regional resilience 7 items
      1. Towards the Resilient Region? - Stuart Dawley, Andy Pike, John Tomaney 12/2010

        Article Recommended

      2. Regional resilience: theoretical and empirical perspectives - S. Christopherson, J. Michie, P. Tyler 01/03/2010

        Article Optional

  11. Week Eleven: Grim up north? Economy and society in North East England 1 item
  12. Media articles and reports relevant to the module 2 items
    Items I have noted in the press. Please let me know if you have suggestions of other links to be added to this page.
    1. Cities Outlook 2012 - Centre for Cities 2012

      Website Optional See further data at http://www.citiesoutlook.org/

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